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September 28, 2010

Social Media Marketing is Dying

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If nothing is certain, one thing is – social media is losing its magic. What once was a new and improved way to keep in touch with your closest loved ones has become just another sales pitch to convince you to sign up to another dreadful business opportunity, newsletter, product, or service. There is no opening or closing – simply raw advertisements that lack sincerity. The people advertising their products don’t care about you or your general interests. They’re too set on the idea that you’re going to sign up and turn them into a success.

What’s wrong with this picture? Could it be that the advertisements lack taste and real value, or could it be that the people who want your business care less about who you are and what you are interested in?

What business entrepreneurs are forgetting is that they are on the other side of the fence of social media. They are on the advertising end, which means without a real connection to the “the people,” they are getting nowhere. At some point, a real connection needs to be established or otherwise all efforts to make a sale or spread the word are pointless.

The truth? No one cares about you unless you care about them, particularly when it comes to social media. Let’s say that you’ve got an account with Facebook. Each day when you see those tiny red notifications, you’re dead sure that they signify a message from your friends or family. Unfortunately, you open your inbox and all you see are loud advertisements. What do you do? You delete them, and you do so automatically without any interest whatsoever about what they say.

Advertising gurus are no longer “gurus,” they are simply annoying spammers who have no clue what they are doing. Business owners are missing the point. If their emails are getting read, it’s only by other advertisers just so they can compare tactics and techniques. Another sad part of it all is that no one is coming up with new techniques. Everyone is following someone who they think is successful, but in reality, no one is making any money because of their lack of effort and knowledge.

If you haven’t noticed (and you most likely have), all online entrepreneurs go about advertising their businesses in the same way. First, they request you as a friend or become a follower (Twitter). Some of them may greet you with a “thanks for the request” or some other similar phrase, while others jump straight to the point and start bombarding you with their “winning” sales pitch. Who are you more likely to communicate with? Nothing screams “delete” louder and faster than a sales pitch.

Some of the “thanks for the request” people might actually make it, as long as they don’t jump the gun too quickly. Unfortunately, the majority of them end it right there and automatically go on a link-posting frenzy, and immediately begin flooding your inbox with details about their products with no mention of how they might benefit you individually. It’s almost as if they are “demanding” that you purchase from them without any clear reason as to why.

On the other hand, some people are making sales. They are the ones who take their time in getting to know people. They ask questions and take a true interest in their prospects. Developing customer relationships is the most important part of advertising on social media because in
the real world, customer relationships are a must.

It helps to wear the shoe on the other foot. Picture walking into a store with workers that aren’t friendly and don’t seem to have your interest anywhere in their top priorities. They are anxious for you to buy something and that is it. They don’t care what you buy or why, they just want your money. When you leave, they want you to come back over and over, even if you’re not interested in what they’ve got. It’s a horrible experience for both you and them.

When you look at it from a different perspective, it helps to see why social media is dying for your company. What people want is warmth and a display of interest in who they are, not lousy sales pitches. As soon as business professionals establish a connection, then they might have
a chance, but until then, it’s best to just stick to more familiar means of advertising and leave social media to what it was always meant for. Bring common sense back to your marketing.


Former Software CEO turned Internet Marketer. Duncan Wierman shows you how to use creative marketing methods to create a full time income online. Duncan is the originalcreator of the software that finds business LEADS and converts them to income. Get a trial copy at:
www.OnlineLeadFinder.com.

21 Responses to “Social Media Marketing is Dying

    avatar David Folley says:

    You have read my thoughts exactly Duncan. I have spent the last three months researching web marketing specialist to develop a way forward to expand my fine art business online.

    Having signed up to 15 ‘marketing experts’ I am like you disappointed with the lack of creativity from these marketing gurus. I have found however, there are one or two ideas which occasionally helpful; but, it seems such a long drawn out
    process – and like most business men I’m impatient to increase my market share.

    Now I notice at the end of your article Duncan you have developed software for finding business LEADS and converts them to income.

    I will sign up to experience how your approach differs from the other online marketeers. I am seeking a refreshing innovative marketing campaign.

    Great article, wishing you well,

    David

    David’s new project is the Heritage Collection; painting views of national Trust gardens.

    avatar leisa says:

    I’d like to hear others opinions on this as to whether they think its really true . Does anyone know of a client that they are making good ROI through social media. Which methods and is it all hype

    avatar SKETCH3D says:

    I definitely agree with the article. I contribute to construction style forums. The amount of spam that is added is unbelievable and totally irrelevant to the topics. Fortunately these forums are well moderated, but there must be companies paying good money to these spammers to waste every ones time and ruin the company’s reputation.
    As far as email spam goes, deleted straight away.
    Phone call from call centres, I am now resorting to being rude as soon as the call appears to be direct marketing.

    avatar John Gaydon says:

    This is a very interesting article. It doesn’t matter how you get people into your sphere of influence, no one really cares what you have until they know you care. For those of us who are genuine and don’t just say what works, it is a difficult path as we find many so called experts are either novices who were told to fake it till you make it, or people who are only in it for the money. They won’t survive in the long term! When something looks bright and shiny, think carefully before you buy!

    How refreshing to hear someone not promote social media as a marketing platform. It isn’t, and shouldn’t ever be. It is, as the author says, for folk to socialise. And few people want to socialise with a company, even if it’s offering seemingly irresistable deals. It’s frankly boring. I can’t imagine anyone thinking, “Oh, I wonder how so-and-so company is doing this morning. I’ll just log into its Twitter account and see if it’s alright.”

    That isn’t to say that companies shouldn’t use the likes of Twitter and Facebook, but rather if they do that they should use them to properly engage with their customers and not attempt to sell anything. Use it to get feedback; to understand and actually enjoy the company of your customers.

    avatar Lisa Pecunia says:

    While I don’t think the title of this article befits your message, I think the message is crystal clear.

    I tend to steer my clients away from Facebook and Twitter unless they have a clear relationship-building strategy in place, and the proper resources to implement it sincerely and organically.

    Social media is not a marketing silver bullet. Like any media, customers will ignore your message if it’s irrelevant or too pushy. If anything, SM is even MORE sensitive to blatant self-promotion.

    Great article, I’ll be sending it around…

    Lisa

    well social media can never die but i guess so its really losing its magic but magic never ends remember that. its a great platform to share information and it cannot be closed because all the time search engine is getting benefits and people are also getting knowledge from it

    avatar Sudeep says:

    Awesome point. I had this in my mind for a long time while I first visited twitter,
    but, don’t you think you are doing the same :)

    Thank you for your article!

    I must agree with you that some of our friends or contacts on these Social Media Network really only care about their ads. I have noticed that a lot of my contacts have asked to me to be friends so that I can “make them rich”. I am also into advertising, but I try to socialize with everyone in my network. Majority of them do not even respond to you if you make a comment on their postings, or wish them a Happy Birthday. Nothing at all and it really makes one wonders why they even bother to add you as a friend.

    Most of the people using social networks are selling something. When looking to buy something we all go to a search engine. Social media adds to your search engine rankings so your site comes up higher in the SERPs.

    avatar John Summer says:

    Cudos! We host car dealer sites all across the country and Social Media has been a buzz phrase with our clients. One comment asked about ROI. A client told us during a meeting he allocated $500 a month for most of the year for PPC at one of the SM sites. Zero sales and ZERO website traffic was the result. ROI on Facebook is measured by the number of friends you catch up with or make, not the number of ads you click on. The ROI is targeted towards the intended users, not the advertisers. Spending money is the only way some advertisers will learn, but eventually, they all learn.

    Amen, brother Duncan. Well said. That is perhaps the most concise, to-the-point, quitcher-whining-and-get-it-right piece about social media I’ve read. Marketers don’t realize fundamentals are still important — understand and address your customers’ pains. Consumers really don’t care about you and what you’re offering until you care about them.

    avatar Bill Platt says:

    Social Media Marketing has been misused from its onset… It has never been a mass-marketing tool, so therefore, as most marketers use it today, it could never be truly effective.

    avatar Karen Swim says:

    Duncan, your article echoes some of my own thoughts but also points to what I believe is an important cross roads. Advertising, traditionally was rather impersonal. We did not need the laundry detergent brand to “care” about us in order to gain our interest in their advertising. As we add engagement marketing to the mix of broadcast advertising we have created a different set of expectations but as business owners, and marketers we still need to actively cultivate business in order to survive. Social media marketing in some ways is a misnomer, as we discover that we can utilize social media to find the people to eventually market to but marketing should not be the entry point for the relationship.

    This is better than your last sales pitch Duncan.

    Heres the realization though.
    Craiglist is getting over crowded with overabundant so called want to be marketers that think because they can scan craigslist for emails give them the right to spam people. Ive used your app and never get nothing more than compaints from real brick and mortar companies that are trying to sell thier own service.

    All in all social media marketing is not dying it’s actually going to get harder for companies as technology is hurting the normal process of picking up an actuall phone and doing business.

    Good luck on your sales.

    avatar Steve says:

    How refreshing to finally find someone that is equally fed up & cheesed off with the Eastend car salesman pitch, the ones that will happily tell you anything if it means making a sale.
    The sooner these so called marketing gurus realise that we are not sheep & that we do have minds of our own, the better off we will all be.
    Yes by all means dress your shop window & show what you have on offer, but the more you try to ram it down my throat, the more likely I am to throw up!
    As for mailing lists & the never ending tricks that are tried in order to get you to sign up, this is just legalized spamming and the sooner it is banned the better.

    avatar RonP says:

    Good article. I’ve been wondering lately, what if any impact FB advertising was doing. Yes, we LOTS of impressions, but with some of CPC shooting into the stratosphere at over $6.00 per, you’ve got to have a bucket of money to keep up.

    Boils down to it’s all about trust & relationships.

    avatar LindaH says:

    You are spot on with this article I’m so tired of people thinking they are all guru’s and the stuff they are sharing is something even my kids already know. :-(

    Linda Hinkle

    avatar Julie Nield says:

    I found this article very interesting and informative. Keep up the good work.

    avatar Mr. Knows says:

    I understand what this article is saying, but the real problem is that sites like Facebook encouraged businesses to make fan pages. Then they encouraged people to share links. They are more to blame for the excessive spam then anyoone else. They fact still remains that you need to build relationships, but even those are fake. There is no way around it; All links shared with sales intent are not friends really. But what can a business with a limited time to build these so-called “relationships” do?

    avatar Shruti says:

    Nice article.I liked it and hope we get more about social marketing in future.Thanks for sharing

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